Our second tour with Beth Hin was to visit the Bushmen of the Kalahari, descendents from the oldest race on earth. Like most indigenous people they have been savagely persecuted over the years and now number a mere 30,000 spread over various parts of South Africa, Namibia and Botswana.

Beth wished to spend time with them, meet there leaders and to connect at a level beyond the normal western way. She explained the gift that these once gentle and caring people had for mankind was being withheld.

The gift is very subtle – a way of communicating with others that is quite foreign to us westeners. Bushmen do not have any energetic or vibrational barriers to communication. They just do not have the type of constant dialogue going on in the mind that we tend to have. We have put up barriers around ourselves that are tangible to the extremely sensitive and gifted psychics.

One can talk to a Bushmen about any subject or concept and you will find them to be receptive and open to what you have to say. Not so with the majority of westeners. We have many taboos. As Beth explained, ” When two westernised people walk down the street towards each other, a constant mental dialogue is going on that sets up protective barriers – I don’t like her dress, she is fat, look at her hair, he is tall, she is pretty, what an awful colour etc. etc.”

One does not experience this with Bushmen. There is a sense that one can literally walk through a Bushman’s energy field because they have this clear understanding of the oneness of the universe. There is no separation. They are so in tune with the earth and every tiny piece is important and with a purpose. Bushmen do not see themselves as being superior to the animal, mineral and plant kingdoms. Everything is equal.

Our purpose was to connect at a heart level and receive this gift of openness freely transmitted by the Bushmen.

The Kalahari can be very hot in summer and chilly at night in winter. The timing of our visit was just perfect and the weather warm but not too hot.

Our friend Clare again joined our group and we travelled by road from Cape Town, stopping overnight en route. The welcome we received was joyous and we spent time connecting with various of the Bushmen community, including their elected leader Dawid Kruiper. Son of the late and revered Elder, Regopstaan Kruiper. Dawid took on the mantle as leader for the Bushman community upon the death of his father.

The lifestyle of the Bushman has changed little over the years and most live in grass huts in the hot and arid region of the Kalahari desert.

Tragically, most of the Bushmen community, including their leader, have resorted to alcohol abuse to dull the pain of the circumstances in which they now find themselves. Since the arrival of the Black Tribes from the north and the white settlers from Europe, some 400 years or so ago, the Bushmen have literally been driven from the land they once lived and hunted on. At one time they were considered as vermin to be shot on site. Gradually, these hunter gatherers who were nomadic by nature, moving around with the migrating wildlife, found life increasingly difficult as the wildlife they depended on was slaughtered and the land occupied by tribes and settlers.

Our much awaited visit to meet and pray with Dawid Kruiper and his family occurred mid afternoon as the day cooled to a comfortable 27 to 30 degrees centigrade. We sat around a fire with Dawid and listened to stories from his younger days. Beth had earlier indicated that the actual transmission would probably occur in a seemingly innocuous way and that we should all be alert and watch for signs of this. She said it will probably not come direct from Dawid but from another person.

We sat in the red sand of the Kalahari and most of us removed our shoes to enjoy the feel of of it between our toes and fingers. A wonderful sharing took place that afternoon as we sat and prayed with Dawid and his family and something remarkable happened. Firstly, Dawid’s daughter brought her young baby daughter from her hut to meet us. Beth held her in her arms as her friend David Heckley and I stood with her. The baby gazed with big dark eyes into David’s eyes and transfixed him. They remained looking at each other for a long time, as if the rest of us just were not present. David suddenly broke down and the tears rolled down his face. He later told us that he was hit by a huge wave of love that washed through him. He had never experienced anything like it before in his life and was changed in an instant.

We then noticed the sky. It was something Audrey and I will never forget. Simmultanously it was sunny, blue sky, raining, thunder, lightning, clouds and rainbows appeared. The sky was filled with vivid colour and Audrey later described the huge spirit beings that she saw gathered at that place.

As the sun set we sliced up and shared water melons we had brought with us and handed over some gifts of school books, pens, food and clothing for distribution by Dawid.

This journey was to become a landmark trip. Not only for Audrey and I but also for Clare, who felt irresistably drawn to the plight of these Bushmen. She felt that she just had to get involved and upon her return to Cape Town, immediately set about plans to sell her house and move to the Kalahari. Clare is now resident in the Kalahari, providing care, medical assistance, counselling and other social responsibility programmes among the Bushmen community.

We have developed close ties with the Bushmen of the Kalahari and support them in various ways. One of our Dutch friends was so moved by her Bushman experience during one of our tours, that she held fund raising events after her return home, to further support the work that Clare is doing.